December 04, 2003

rejection massively reduces iq

There are a couple of scientists who have found a strong correlation between rejection and a drop in ability to reason. References: New Scientist, acfnewsource, and Prof Jean Twenge.

I'm waiting with baited breath for someone else to replicate the results.

If there is a causal relationship between rejection and lowered intellectual performance, the implications are very far-reaching. The impact of racism and sexism must be huge. The classic, "Yeah, I really like, you. Pity you're so smart" comment becomes a whole lot more sinister.

Also, I wonder what might mitigate the effect. Quite a few geeks remain smart despite being harrassed for it at school. Do they have an internal mechanism for retaining their intelligence despite being rejected? How long does the effect last? Would you have to be rejected in class to effect your scholastic performance, or would it be enough to be hassled at home that morning? Would God's love help? If so, is that one of the reasons the Judeo-Christian-Muslim religions have done well? What if people misunderstanding your culture is read as rejection by the subject?

A huge pile of research indicates many offenders have reduced cognitive function (especially when they offend). Is societal rejection on release increasing their chances of making crap decisions and reoffending? Would that be another place where religions preaching love and acceptance of others have a cumulative benefit for the societies where they are followed? Was Christ trying to give us a competative advantage?

Given that behaviour modification does seem to work, and it involves punishing people for fuckups, is one of the success factors the ability to reject the *behaviour* rather than the person? Is this part of the reason that the most effective ratio of positive to negative responses in behaviour modification programmes is 12 positive to 1 negative?

Wheeee! Question Girl strikes again!

Posted by carla at December 4, 2003 11:43 AM
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